Linalool

Linalool (/lɪˈnælˌɒl, l-, –lˌɔːl, –ləˌwɒl, –ləˌwl/ or /ˌlɪnəˈll/[1][2]) refers to two enantiomers of a naturally occurring terpene alcohol found in many flowers and spice plants. These have multiple commercial applications, the majority of which are based on its pleasant scent (floral, with a touch of spiciness). It has other names such as β-linalool, linalyl alcohol, linaloyl oxide, p-linalool, allo-ocimenol, and 3,7-dimethyl-1,6-octadien-3-ol.

Nature

Over 200 species of plants produce linalool, mainly from the families Lamiaceae (mint and other herbs), Lauraceae (laurels, cinnamon, rosewood), and Rutaceae (citrus fruits), but also birch trees and other plants, from tropical to boreal climate zones, including fungi.[3]

Biosynthesis

In higher plants, linalool, as other monoterpenoids, is produced from isopentenyl pyrophosphate via the universal isoprenoid intermediate geranyl pyrophosphate, through a class of membrane-bound enzymes named monoterpene synthases. One of these, linalool synthase (LIS), has been reported to produce (S)-linalool in several floral tissues.

Uses

Linalool is used as a scent in 60% to 80% of perfumed hygiene products and cleaning agents including soaps, detergents, shampoos, and lotions.[4]

It is also used as a chemical intermediate. One common downstream product of linalool is vitamin E.

In addition, linalool is used by pest professionals as a flea, fruit fly and cockroach insecticide. It can also be used a method of pest control for codling moths. Linalool create a synergistic effect with the codling moth’s phermone called codlemone, which increases attraction of males.[5]

Linalool is used in some mosquito-repellent products;[6] however, the EPA notes that “a preliminary screen of labels for products containing [l]inalool (as the sole active ingredient) indicates that efficacy data on file with the Agency may not support certain claims to repel mosquitos.”[7]

Plants that contain linalool

Safety and potential toxicity

Linalool can be absorbed by inhalation of its aerosol and by oral intake or skin absorption, potentially causing irritation, pain and allergic reactions.[3] Between 5% and 7% of patients undergoing patch testing in Sweden were found to be allergic to the oxidized form of linalool.[4] Upon inhalation, it may also cause drowsiness or dizziness.[3]

 

source: wikipedia